Tag Archives: swedish folk

Cushions!

Latest weaving – two cushions in rölakan (interlocked tapestry)  technique

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This one is variation on antique carriage cushion from Bara district, Skåne.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And this one is a little sampling of local birds from folk textiles

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I have used wool yarn from Wålstedts spinning mill -Wålstedts gobelänggarn Nm 5/2.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

birthday present for a good man

While I am digging in the garden and not weaving much I will post some pictures from a month ago –
our joint (my husband’s and mine) birthday present for my father in law – a stool with a cushion
My husband made the stool after Peter Follansbee’s 17 century model, and I tried to come up with a cushion – free variation on 18 century Skåne weaving :)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I forgot to take a picture of the backside, here you can see a little.

Himmelskt vackert i Ystad

“Heavenly beautiful” – called the exhibition of folk weavings  from Skåne (Skania) in Ystad. I went there three times already, two of them to demo-weave at the “weaving cafe”, and it is still overwhelming , to think that this just a tip of an iceberg of all the textiles that where produced in ordinary homes in this area of Sweden  in 17-19 centuries.

The museum building is an old Franciscan monastery from XII century.

The weaving cafe – the most luxurious weaving shed I have been to. I will be there again this weekend.

Some pictures from the exhibition, sorry for the quality, all the textiles lighted with special museum light,
wich is good for the cloth, but pictures need severe color correction, which they barely survive.

Krabbasnår:

Rölakan:

Blådrätter – dukagång, blue wool on white linen base:

krabbasnår:

reindeer is a  popular motif in rölakan:

dukagång:

a photograph showing Skanian textile mounter at Baltic exhibition in 1914:

I have more pictures here.

my world is flat

Little experiments for the last school assignment  – three dimensional weaving using unusual materials as a weft (anything but yarn).

number one –  spring comes to our little world :

technically it’s not quite 3D,  but it’s not 2D either

number two – Ash bird (used nice long and curly ash wood shavings from my husband’s woodworking),
again quite flat, except the tail.  100% biodegradable, very eco-friendly bird.

Well, at least I kept my family entertained :)

The rest of the time I spent doing traditional flatweave – finished the rölakan sample

and started new folk weaving with the same happy colors:

krabbasnår and munk’s belt (munkabälte) this time:

primordial stitch

The more I looked at the traditional north-Russian embroideries from the region of Karelia the more I wanted to try one of these motifs.  I decided  to weave a linen cloth for it (mainly because i couldn’t find the cloth with the right feeling – rough and soft at the same time), from the old handspun linen yarn (which I bought from a Swedish weaver, her blog is one of my favourites). Both the warp and the weft are single linen threads.

weaving this little cloth wasn’t easy, even if I painted the warp with a jelly from cooked flax seeds  to strengthen it , the last 30 cm of weaving was pain. Luckily the warp was quite short (I was surprised it lasted for more than 1m).

Traditional Karelian embroideries are done with red color on white cloth, I wanted to make mine with white thread on indigo background, don’t ask me why.

Since it was my first attempt with indigo vat , I didn’t dare to dye the whole piece, so I cut out one-third of it. And it worked quite well and fast! (I used hydrosulfit method).

the stitching technique is one of the oldest and very similar to traditional european blackwork, and on the wrong side is supposed to look exactly the same as on the right side (and no knots!)  Well, luckily  I don’t have to show the back side of my embroidery piece to anybody :-)

(for somebody really curious – this little video shows  how they do it Karelia ,the woman on video is talking about how it is important that embroidery looks exactly the same on both sides – both because while doing it you exercise your brain and because “you have nothing to hide” from the world around you – there is no back side of life)

gardening and some folk motifs

As usual at this time of the year I am all busy digging, sowing and re-planting (all the veg and flower plus the hedge)  not so much time for textile work.
But  some of my gardening  is actually fiber-related, like flax (six different sorts from the genebank)

and japanese indigo. Bought seeds from Wildcolors in UK, (£3.50 for 10 seeds),
nobody seems to grow  japanese indigo in Sweden…

well,  some peripheral knitting has been going on too – another random sock

nearly finished a cardigan for my man

and last Sunday when it stared to rain (finally, no need to water the garden !)  we went to Kulturen open-air museum to look (again) at some allmoge woodworking and textiles.

more pictures from Kulturen in my flickr

band weaving

Attended a little workshop on band and ribbon weaving at Möllegården Kultur.  Tried weaving with band loom,  with rigid heddle, with tablets and two different ways of band braiding (of hundreds possible).   There where four nice women ready to teach anybody who came by, lots of old gorgeous bands from Charlotte Weibulls collection hanging around, books and instructions,  and visitors aged from 7 to 77 who sat and tried different tools . I had fun :)

one day I might try weaving with tablets or band rigid heddle (both are very portable and simple tools).

Tablets can easily be crafted at home  from used milk package and old band weaving heddles can be found on flea markets.

Charlotte Weibull’s collection

I discovered this place a couple of weeks ago, it is just around the corner from where we live and I pass it on my bike on my way to work and back home – a local folklore  center Möllegården Kultur, which (permanently!) displays Charlotte Weibull’s entire collection of swedish folk costumes and dolls .  I am mostly fascinated by the row of aprons hanging along the wall in a large room – all possible combinations of colors in different stripe patterns, such a  huge  inspiration resource, I will definitely go back there (again and again).

here is just a tiny bit of details:

Some more (and slightly bigger) pictures in my flickr.

%d bloggers like this: